Wall of Barriers Activity: Distinguish Between Reasonable and Unreasonable Ideas Within a Group
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Activity:
Distinguish Between Reasonable and Unreasonable Ideas Within a Group
Starting at a very young age, humans begin fitting themselves into groups. They do so not by their own choice, but out of instinct, and primarily in order to survive. Young children lack the skills to critique the beliefs thrust upon them by these various groups— to determine group practices that make sense to accept, to identify those that need modification, and to abandon those that should be rejected. Thus, from a very young age, humans for the most part uncritically accept the beliefs of family, school, religion, peers—indeed any group in which they become members. Then they spend their lives largely defending and building on views they have uncritically accepted as children. As we age, we don’t naturally become less sociocentric, just perhaps more sophisticated in our sociocentrism.
Use the template below to distinguish between the reasonable and unreasonable ideas within one group you belong to.
Complete these statements:
1. Some beliefs in this group that seem to make perfect sense, objectively speaking, are...
2. Some beliefs in this group that cause problems are...
3. I believe that these beliefs need to be replaced with the following, more rational, beliefs...